Tag: Safety

Bicycle Safety and Pennsylvania Laws

When you’re commuting on your bike, you’re likely to share the road with cars. If you know the laws, safety rules, and have the right attitude, you can be a confident, streetwise cyclist.

General Bicycle Law

Pennsylvania’s Vehicle Code considers “pedalcycles” as vehicles and provides that every person riding a pedalcycle upon a roadway shall be granted all of the rights and responsibilities applicable to a driver of a vehicle, with certain exceptions discussed below.

If you ride in violation of the traffic laws, you greatly increase your risk of a crash and will likely be found at fault in the event of an accident.

Riding on the Roadway

  • Bikes may be ridden on the shoulder of the road (in the same direction as the flow of traffic) but are not required to do so.

  • Bikes may also ride on the right half of the roadway as follows:

  • On a

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National Bicycle Safety Month means watching out for inanimate objects

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Not sure when National Bicycle Safety Month began, but I’m pretty sure there wasn’t such a month when I was riding my neighborhood streets in

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Bicycle helmets | Product Safety Australia

This mandatory standard prescribes requirements for the design, construction, performance and safety marking of bicycle helmets.

A bicycle helmet is designed to offer protection to the cyclist’s head during impact. It features a:

  • shell
  • liner
  • retention strap fitted along the lower jaw area.

The mandatory standard prescribes requirements for the design, construction, performance and safety marking of bicycle helmets.

The Trade Practices (Consumer Product Safety Standards) Regulations 2001—Bicycle Helmets sets out the mandatory requirements for bicycle helmets.

This mandatory standard is based on certain sections of the voluntary Australian and New Zealand Standard, AS/NZS 2063:2008—Bicycle helmets. AS/NZA 2063:2008 is available from SAI Global.

You must consult the mandatory standard for these details.

The listed requirements aim to give suppliers a general idea of what is required by the mandatory standard. Suppliers must not rely on this information as a complete guide to compliance.

Testing

The mandatory standard specifies testing to

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Car Seat.Org – Carseat, Automobile & Child Passenger Safety Community Forums

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Bicycle road rules and safety | Transport and motoring

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Bicycles are a type of vehicle—when you ride a bicycle on a Queensland road, you have rights and responsibilities like all other road users.

When you ride a bicycle, you must obey the general road rules the same as other motorists as well as the specific road rules for bicycle riders.

Riding a bicycle

When you ride a bicycle, you must:

  • have 1 leg on each side of the seat
  • face forwards
  • keep at least 1 hand on the handlebars.

Carrying people

You can carry another person if:

  • the bicycle is designed to carry more than 1 person and has a passenger seat
  • each person is wearing a helmet.

Signalling

You must use a hand signal when you turn right. To do this, extend your right arm out horizontally—at a right angle from the right side of the bicycle. Your hand should be open, with your palm facing forward.

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WC Transportation Safety

Motor vehicle transportation, whether in private, public, or school-bus
vehicles, is vital in today’s society. Ready access to transportation is not
only essential for most occupations and education, but also for accessing
healthcare providers, religious services, recreation and leisure activities, shopping, voting, and many other community activities and services. As reported
by the National Council on Disability, the need for transportation is even
greater for individuals who use wheelchairs, including those who are unable
to transfer out of their wheelchair when traveling (Bureau of Transportation
Statistics, 2002; National Council on Disability, 2005). 

In situations where
the wheelchair must function as a motor-vehicle seat, serious concerns arise. 
Transportation safety and occupant crash-protection studies have shown that
a motor vehicle seat is an important part of an occupant-protection system. 

For this reason, wheelchairs that are used as motor vehicle seats must also be designed for this purpose. Wheelchairs prescribed for individuals

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Kids and Bicycle Safety

Safe Riding Tips
Before using your bicycle, make sure it is ready to ride. You should always

inspect your bike to make sure all parts are secure and working properly.

Remember to:

  • Wear a Properly Fitted Bicycle Helmet. Protect your brain, save your life. For more information see the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration publication

    “Easy Steps to Properly Fit a Bicycle Helmet.”
  • Adjust Your Bicycle to Fit. Stand over your bicycle. There should be 1 to 2 inches between you and the top tube (bar) if using a road bike and 3 to 4 inches if a mountain bicycle. The seat should be level front to back. The seat height should be adjusted to allow a slight bend at the knee when the leg is fully extended. The handlebar height should be at the same level with the seat.
  • Check Your Equipment. Before
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Hokey Spokes – Brilliant Bicycle Safety Light System 0

 

HGTV
“I Want That!”

PC Magazine
“Top Ten Best Gadgets
 for the Ultimate Ride!”

Reader’s Digest
 Holiday Gift Guide

 

World Exhibit of
Innovation, Research
and New Technologies

Brussels
“…for its innovative design and contribution to bicycle safety.”
2nd Place
(Out of 700 Entries
from 30 Countries)

 

  What are Hokey Spokes?

Hokey Spokes Hokey Spokes are transparent “blades” that attach to your bicycle spokes. As these blades spin during riding, a computer inside the blades modulates the internal LED lights so that design images and custom text appear.

The user can decide how many spokes in a variety of colors they want to place on the bicycle wheel. Up to 6 “Blades” can be placed on each wheel. The more blades, the more visibility and persistence of vision at lower speeds. 2 Blades/Wheel look good, 3 Blades/Wheel look great, and more than three look amazing. The rider above has 3 Blades/wheel.

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KDOT: Bicycle Safety

 

                

           
        
                   

In Kansas, bicyclists are required to follow the same    rules of the road as motorists.  Please ride safely, be courteous to other    roadway users, and abide by all Kansas traffic laws.  Always ride a well-maintained    bicycle and know your riding limitations.  You should be able to ride comfortably    with minimal strain at least half of the total distance planned to be covered    each day of your tour.

   

     

Helmets:  Bicyclists are strongly encouraged to wear American National Standards Institute   (ANSI), or the American Society for Testing and Materials  (ASTM), or Snell Memorial Foundation  (Snell) approved helmets at all times.

Paved Shoulders:  Bicyclists are strongly encouraged to ride on paved shoulders which are equal to or greater than three feet in width whenever they are available.

Ride to the Right, With Traffic:  Ride with normal traffic flow and ride to the right side of the roadway.  If lane width allows, stay within

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Bicycle Safety

Bicycle Safety Introduction

Bicycling is a common means of transportation as well as an increasingly popular source of recreation, exercise, and sport. With more than 100 million bicycle owners, the popularity of bicycling has reached an all-time high.

Along with increased use of bicycles comes the risk of significant injuries. According to national statistics, more than 1.8 billion bicycle outings occur each year, resulting in nearly 494,000 visits to emergency departments. Injuries related to bicycling range from common abrasions, cuts, and bruises to broken bones, internal injuries, head trauma, and even death.

More than 900 bicyclists die annually, and 20,000 are admitted to hospitals. From a statistical standpoint, bicycle riding has a higher death rate per trip or per mile of travel than being a passenger in an automobile. The majority of bicycle deaths are caused by head injuries.

The most common cause of bicycle crashes

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